What causes a swollen arm after a flu shot? How can it be …

  • What causes a swollen arm after a flu shot? How can it be treated?

    When you inject something, you cause localized irritation to the muscles and nerves. Swelling is the body’s reaction to an irritant.

    Some recommend an ice pack.

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    If the swelling is localized around the injection site, this is a common occurence. The flu vaccine is given in a muscle…In this case, the deltoid muscle. Occasionally the injected liquid will form a “ball” in the muscle instead of dispersing throughout the muscle. You can massage it lightly to break this up. If it is sore and bothering you, ibuprofen will help. I would not apply heat to the site because that can affect the absorption of the vaccine.

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    It’s a typical autoimmune response. Something poked your arm, so your immune system goes on high alert trying to prevent any pathogens from entering your body via that poke. The vaccine probably has dead pathogens in it (depending on the vaccine type) so your immune system heats up again, but then realizes that this is a false alarm.

    There’s no real way to “treat” this other than letting it pass naturally. You can put a hot pad on the area to make the pain more tolerable, but it should go away on it’s own.

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    A vaccine reaction is an uncommon localized swelling to the area around the injection site. It’s kind of like a hive. Ice, benadryl, and calamine can help.

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    Flu shots are muscle injections, so they cause a small amount of damage to the muscle where the steel needle goes in. When muscle is damaged, your flesh around it swells as it begins the healing process. You can cut down on the swelling by placing a pack of ice on the arm.

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    Swelling is a generic part of the inflammatory response. It doesn’t really require treatment, but if pain is an issue, Tylenol is recommended.

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    sometimes the vaccine can stay in place and cause a slight swelling just massage the injection area and it should settle take some paracetamol if painful

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    You may have a mild allergy to eggs. The flu serum is incubated in chicken eggs, and then refined to be used in the inoculation. That little bit of “egg” can carry over and cause a reaction.

    Most flu injections have a dead virus, but the body builds an immunity response even with the dead virus. It may be that your body is reacting and building the response, too.

    Many people get swelling. It’s a common response. Try cool wash cloths on the area, ibuprofen and an antihistamine. If you don’t see a reduction within a day or two, contact your physician for more information.

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    Vaccinations work through injecting you with a small dose of the infection it hopes to prevent. The swelling in the arm (and sometimes nausea and other symptoms) are, in fact, the flu, though localized. The small dose is intended to stimulate your immune system to create antibodies that will later help you stave off the varieties of virus to which we are exposed daily. Vaccination, however, does not work for everyone. Sometimes, vaccination overwhelms the immune system and can cause harm to it. Some chronic immune-system disorders have been traced back to immunizations. Yet, this has been a small percentage of the population. The question is whether we save most people from disease at the expense of a very few, or if we risk the lives of millions of people because a very few get ill.

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    Vaccination is an artificial infection, so the arm swells because the body reacts to the chemicals and biological matter in vaccines by mounting an inflammation. Vaccines should not ever be injected into a living organism, so it is best to prevent such reactions by not having shots in the first place.

    To treat, take high doses of sodium ascorbate vitamin C or Lypos-spheric vitamin C. Putting a bag of ice on the swelling may also help. But most importantly, refuse all future vaccinations.

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    I was 48 yrs old and had never had the flu and had never gotten the flu shot. I had worked with the public all my life, was around children, had nursed others through the flu. La la la. Then I got caught. I was sick in bed for over a month. Seriously thought I was going to die. I’ve had serious bouts of bronchitis and pneumonia as well as all the normal…colds, ear infections, etc. Never been anywhere close to being as sick as I was when I had the flu. I now get the flu shot every year. I learned my lesson.

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