What is the medical name for the inside of the bend of the …

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    The antecubital fossa or space as outlined in the image below:

    The triangular region in the forearm on the anterior (flexor) surface of the elbow. Bounded laterally by the brachioradialis muscle and medially by the pronator teres muscle, the fossa contains the tendon of the biceps brachialis muscle and the brachial artery. Two large superficial veins, the cephalic and its branch, the median cubital, are common sites for blood drawing.

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    What is the medical name for the inside of the bend of the elbow?

    The cubital area. To answer similar questions about all sorts of things, try a Reverse Dictionary. Reader’s Digest publishes a good one with lots of illustrations but there are others. Ever wonder what those square things sticking up from the tops of castle walls are? They are called crenellations, and were for soldiers to hide behind while getting more ammunition. Your bit of trivia for the day.

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    citation: Netter Human Anatomy. Cubital fossa is the actual “pit” part.

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    Another vote for antecubital fossa.

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    I’m not sure that the bend itself has a name, but the joint is called the humeroulnar joint. The surface above the posterior side of the joint is called the cubital region. The surface above the anterior side is sometimes called the antecubital region (where blood is typically drawn). However, some texts call both anterior and posterior surfaces the cubital region and do not differentiate.

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    The bend of the elbow doesn’t have a medical name. Just as the bend of the knee doesn’t.

    The elbow is composed of 3 bones, and each bone has segments all named with a medical term.

    The bone you feel on the inside is the medial epicondyle of the humerus.

    If the elbow is bent it is in flexion. When straight it’s in extension.

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    The hollow on the inside (anterior, flexor side) of the elbow is called…

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    • the Antecubital Fossa2

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    From the Latin “cubitus” meaning “elbow”; and “fossa” meaning “pit” or “ditch”

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    That is “ante” meaning “in front” – not “anti” meaning “opposed”

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    The Greek word for a Swallow (The bird) – because the shape of the antecubital fossa supposedly resembles a swallow’s tail. (These were the same people that saw dragons and scorpions and mighty hunters in the sky!)

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    It is pronounced with a hard “K” sound. i.e. KEL-uh-don

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    Yuk! Surely nobody actually says that? Maybe I’m just an anatomy snob – but who would choose to say that in preference to “antecubital fossa”?

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    Although I don’t advise any medical students to use this synonym in their anatomy exams!

    The technical term for it is “cubital fossa”.

    In the course of tracking that down, I discover:

    1) “Cubitum” was a word invented by speakers of Latin to describe the forearm (hence “cubit”, the length of it). The Germanic word was the much briefer ell or eln (also a measure of length): hence “elbow”, the place where the ‘ell’ bends.

    2) Your arm is not what you think it is. In technical anatomical language, the term “arm” covers only the part between the elbow and the shoulder.

    3) fossa means a depression or trench: the word is also used for the outer defensive ditch of a Roman camp.

    4) A fossa is also “a cat-like, carnivorous mammal endemic to Madagascar”. That’s actually the first meaning that comes up in a Google search.

    My mental image of the “cubital fossa” is now something like the cartesian bear.

    Thanks for that question: I learned a few things 🙂

    Oh, and the Linnean name for the (animal) fossa is “cryptoprocta”; because unlike many another cat, it hides its anus from.

    Well you did set me off on this train of associations.

    Areas like the ditch of the elbow, top of the shoulder, wrists, collar bones, hip bones etc. are all prone to blow outs. For different reasons. The ditch of your elbow is because the nature of the skin is to expand and contact more than most other parts of the arm. So, the skin is a little thinner which can be a reason for a blow out. Also, it’s like the skin is composed of little canals. Look at your wrist skin as it turns into arm skin. Big differences. If the tattoo is put in slightly deeper in this skin vs. arm skin, it will bleed along these canals.

    But, as always, research your artist. A good artist will know how to adjust their technique to avoid these issues.

    When the elbow is bent, the ulnar nerve can stretch and catch on the bony bump. … Signs and symptoms of cubital tunnel syndrome usually occur gradually, progressing to the point where the patient seeks medical attention. Left untreated,cubital tunnel syndrome can lead to permanent nerve damage in the hand Please go and seek medical advice doctor or hospital from David

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